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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 101 (some duplicates have been removed)
of political party we want to be asked whether they want to become a party that david brooks, the conservative, described, a party that will not compromise the matter how sweet the deal for the site might be and how great consequences for our nation. >> hariri is talking about conservative "new york tes - -- have we read it is talking about conservative "new york times" columnist david brooks, wrote that the republican party is no longer a normal party. its members, he says, don't accept the logic of compromise. >> forgive me, i have to correct your copy again. he is a great calmness, but he's not conservative -- great columnist, but he's not conservative. he is moderate. >> modate conservative. >> no, he is moderate, open to all views. what you are saying, if you hear eric cantor john boehner, we are ready for tax reform, which was done in the mid-1980's. you cut out the loopholes and you use the money to cut rates. you get the fairness. rich don't have advantages by having the lobbyists create loopholes and exploit them. you stimulate economic growth because the loopholes and in and of thems
. >> they must ask themselves if they want to be the kind of party david brooks, conservative, describe, a party of fanatics who don't compromise no matter how sweet a deal for their side might be and how great consequences for the nation. >> the senate majority leader was talking about conservative and "new york times" columnist david brooks' column saying that the republican party is no longer a normal party. its members, charles, don't accept the logic of compromise. >> forgive me, but i have to correct your copy again. he is a great columnist, but not a conservative. he is a moderate -- >> moderate conservative. >> no, he is a moderate. >> he is a moderate. he is open to all use. i think what republicans are doing on taxes is correct. if you hear eric cantor or john boehner, we are ready for tax reform, which was done in the mid-1980's, a most successful piece of legislation. you cut out the loopholes and use the money to cut rates. you get a fairness and the rich don't have advantages by having lobbyists create loopholes and exploit them, and you stimulate economic growth because the libera
, and former "news of the world" editor, rebekah brooks was riveting for the british and american media, but what did it reveal about how rupert murdoch does business? in tonight's rewrite, how a main newspaper told a republican candidate for senate to get out of the race and why that republican candidate thinks barack obama is not a christian. there was a 93% increase in cyber attacks. in financial transactions... on devices... in social interactions... and applications in the cloud. some companies are worried. some, not so much. thanks to a network that secures it all and knows what to keep in, and what to keep out. outsmart the threats. see how at cisco.com cisco. energy is being produced to power our lives. while energy developement comes with some risk, north america's natural gas producers are committed to safely and responsibly providing decades of cleaner burning energy for our country, drilling thousands of feet below fresh water sources within self contained well systems and using state of the art monitoring technologies, rigorous practices help ensure our operations are safe
son, james murdoch, and former "news of the world" editor, rebekah brooks was riveting for the british and american media, but what did it reveal about how rupert murdoch does business? in tonight's rewrite, how a main newspaper told a republican candidate for senate to get out of the race and why that republican candidate thinks barack obama is not a christian. with precise pain relieving cream. it blocks pain signals fast for relief precisely where you need it most. precise. only from the makers of tylenol. >>> rupert murdoch would like you to believe that he runs his megamedia entire without actually knowing how it works. he'd also like you to believe he's sorry for hacking into your phone. next, how republicans may have squandered their chances to get most of the things they've [ male announcer ] a moment that starts off ordinary can become romantic just like that. a spark might come from -- a touch, a glance -- it can come along anywhere, anytime. and when it does, men with erectile dysfunction can be more confident in their ability to be ready with cialis for daily use. cialis fo
david brooks, conservive, described, no matter how great the consequences are to our nation. >> the senate majority leader is talking about conservative "new york times" columnist david brooks' column, saying that the republicans have been affected by a faction that is more a psychological protest than a practical alternative. its members charles don't accept the logic of compromise. >> forgive me, i have to correct your copy again. he is a great columnist but he's not conservative. he is a moderate. >> moderate conservative. >> no, he is a moderate. >> moderate. he is open to all views. i think the republicans are correct. when you listen to eric cantor, john boehner, we are ready for tax reform. it was done in the mid-19's, a great piece of legislation. you get the fairness, the rich don't have the it manages while having lobbyists create loopholes and exploit them, and you stimulate economic growth because the loopholes are in and of themselves distorting economically and the low rates encourage economic activity. that is what republicans have been asking for, not to elim
be months before they know how much damage is actually been done. >> brown: and david brooks and ruth marcus analyze the week's news. >> lehrer: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> well, the best companies are driven by new ideas. >> our future depends on new ideas. we spend billions on advanced technologies. >> it's all about investing in the future. >> we can find new energy-- more cleaner, safer and smarter. >> collaborating with the best in the field. >> chevron works with the smartest people at leading universities and tech companies. >> and yet, it's really basic. >> it's paying off every day. the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: americans seeking work, and many hoping to hold on to their jobs, found little
. >> strong words. shannon travis, thank you very much. nice to see you. "cnn newsroom" continues with brooke baldwin. >> i like your choice of wardrobe, randi kaye. thanks. look, busy, busy tuesday here. you've been watching all day long, stories breaking everywhere. just a short time ago president obama appeared before reporters saying this, that a bipartisan group of senators has come up with a plan that could pave the way for a deal on america's credit limit. folks, this could be the first bit of good news in weeks as the deadline quickly, quickly approaches. two weeks to the day. we'll get to all that have in a moment here. let's start with this. rupert murdoch and his son were supposed to be the focus of a british parliament hearing today in london but they were upstaged momentarily by an intruder who somehow managed to get very, very close to the murdochs, too close as you're about to see. watch. so no official word yet as to who exactly that guy in the plaid shirt was. we know he was shouting you greedy billionaire, but he pushed a plateful of shaving cream into rupert murdoch's face
monitoring. >> woodruff: mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> suarez: and hari sreenivasan previews the coming clash between the u.s. and japanese teams in the women's world cup final with christine brennan of "u.s.a. today" and abc. >> this is really a little bit about soccer and a lot about nationalism and about, whether it's tidally-winks or soccer, americans want to see americans win. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> well, the best companies are driven by new ideas. >> our history depends on new ideas. we spend billions on advanced technologies. >> it's all about investing in the future. >> we can find new energy-- more cleaner, safer and smarter. >> collaborating with the best in the field. >> chevron works with the smartest people at leading universities and tech companies. >> and yet, it's really basic. >> it's paying off everyday. and the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoi
willing to compromise. today in "new york times," conservative columnist david brooks wrote, quote, if responsible republicans don't take control, independents will conclude republican fanaticism caused this default. they will conclude that republicans are not fit to govern, and they will be right. end of quote. an "usa today" editorial says negotiating with republicans over taxes has become as futile as trying to bargain with the taliban over whether girls should be allowed to attend school. joining me now, senator sherrod brown. senator, how are you today? >> good, reverend sharpton. i liked your line about obama care and romney. pretty good. >> let me ask you, what did you think of the president's statement today? >> i was actually on an airplane during part of that, but i've listened to your comments and read about it, talked about it with people. he's right. the democrats have compromised already. we have made major cuts, proposals of major cuts in many things that we don't really want to cut. they have not been willing to take away tax breaks from oil company, they have not b
including the ceo rebecca brooks who heads to parliament today. uk police being questioned by parliament. they're under scrutiny for failure to investigate previous hacking incidents and alleged ties to executives in murdoch's companies. and "the new york times" reports that aides close to the murdoch family spent years and millions of dollars covering up wrongdoing at the now defunct "news of the world," the "times" cites interviews with hundreds of current and former employees say "the news of the world" paid police for information. and a twist to the story, a reporter and the scandal's first-named whistleblower was found dead yesterday. there's an ongoing investigation but police say the death is, quote, not suspicious. "the guardian" newspaper is reporting that police found a bag in the trash near rebecca brooks' home saying the bag contained a computer, phone, and paperwork. detectives are examining the bag. cnbc reports that murdoch is considering stepping down as news corp. ceo. he could be placed by current chief operating officer, chase carey. meanwhile, standard & poor's now sa
's undoubtedly the case that david cameron lives very close to rebecca brooks in a part of the countryside, there's a chipping norton set like a poughkeepsie set may in the united states, not very glamorous, but at the heart of the -- but previously there was a close relationship between brooks and the murdochs and blair and some of his ministers, too, so the working of that soft power network, where you have the politicians, the media owners and regulations, it's not like the sectors, a much closer nexus there already, and the murdochs have been absolutely superb at courting and capturing the political classes, and making sure that they -- that they bend to their will. the political class -- >> let me jump in for a second. let me bring in toby. as he admitted, politicians sort of -- because they wanted support from the media and pleats were paid off. >> taking payments. some payments were in 1992, it was the sun what won it, the conservatives, an it's been a received wisdom that you needed the endorsement of "the sun" to get into power and get your messages across. that dam seems to have burst,
was that a lie? or just you telling another kind of lie? let's go to something you may like. david brooks, a conservative, is he something -- >> brooks a conservative? >> well, everybody thinks so -- >> that's the funniest one i've heard today. >> let me give you another like. brooks says the gop is willing to alienate atate 80% of voter commit political suicide because of its faith in the power of tax policy? that's funny to you? you think david brooks is a liberal now? >> he amuses me to no end. he's not a serious conservative. people on the far left spectrum thinks david is a serious conservative. running on reducing government, not increasing taxes, guess what? the republicans took control of the house of representatives by historic majorities in 2010 and came close to taking the senate back from a history low. so, you know, hey, let's bat this one up? >> why did they back up today? why did you say that john boehner ought to resign as speaker? you. i mean, if they did all of this -- >> i do want boehner to resign. >> if they did these historic moves last year, you said boehner should
david brooks said, as you well know. "if the republican party were a normal party it would take advantage of this amazing moment. it is being offered trillions of dollars in spending cuts in exchange for a few hundred miion dollarofevenue increases. if the debt ceiling talks fail independent voters will see that democrats were willing to compromise but republicans were not. if responsible republicans don't take control, independents will conclude the republican fanaticism caused this default. they will conclude that republicans are not fit to govern and they will be right." david brooks. >> i don't agree that at all. that discounts the notion that the vast majority of people in this country thinkovernment's way too big and if you lo at them... look at what the role of the government is, i think that's a great insiders's vw, i don't think the that represents the view point of people across this country at all. >> rose: okay, but i suspect if the president said to you or you today the president mr. president, do you think the government's too big? would say, yes, i do. >> i think
his first in command, rebecca brook, was sort of toeing the appropriate line. so whether there's a cover-up there that reaches the highest levels of newscorp or whether it's just the head of a company where there are problems and he's trying to fix them as best he can, i guess we'll -- we may find out. we may not find out. >> some people seem to feel it's really that connection between the rebecca brook, the "news of the world" editor, formerly, and the power that she really had in politics. and david cameron's former assistant also having worked over at the paper. that there just seems to be this coziness that is making people uncomfortable. >> well, i mean, we have the same thing in washington frankly. there's been a lot of coziness over the years. the white house press corps and the -- and government at all levels. i think that's a problem when people live and work and depend on each other for their livelihood. as the press and powerful people do. but, you know, i think murdoch is probably -- may not be the person this hits. i mean, i wonder if there's -- if there's an equiv
to declare victory and say yes. >> well, take a look at david brooks' column today in "the new york times." that is one of the most brilliant columns called a no-brain no-brainer. >> you preferred to david brooks' column in today's "new york times." david brooks by all accounts a conservative. i'm with you. a spectacular column. i want to quote the last passage to you. i happen to have it right here in front of me. how about that? it says if responsible republicans don't take control, independents will conclude that republican fanaticism caused this default. they will conclude that republicans are not fit to govern and they will be right. do you agree with david brooks and that conclusion? >> oh, i do. i was with him here recently at the aspen festival. bright guy, thoughtful person. but, you know, really, i know these wonderful republican colleagues and democratic colleagues. houn how could they ever get to a point where some guy is pulling out a sheet of paper that they signed when everything was roses in america and now we're headed for the bow wows and he's standing throughout shrill
conservative voices like david brooks of "the new york times" are telling republicans it's time to make a deal. brooks wrote this week and it got a lot of attention. if the debt ceiling talks fail, independent voters will see that democrats were willing to compromise but republicans were not. if responsible republicans don't take control, independents will conclude that republican fanaticism caused this default. they will conclude that republicans are not fit to govern and they will be right. got a lot of attention. i asked senator jim demint about it. and he said, well, david brooks doesn't speak for true republicans. that's what he said. >> he doesn't speak for jim demint, that's for sure. he certainly doesn't speak for some of the house freshmen that were elected on the whole idea -- this whole tea party fols fi that they're going to come to washington and shake things up, basically be obstructionists. but david brooks is absolutely right. what weave seen here in washington is kind of a sad note over the past couple of years. we've seen negotiators and compromisers leave. so many senators h
a group of comments from the new york time from washington david brooks, with me here in new york, david leonhardt, roger cohen and tom friedman. they have all won too many awards to talk about. mi pleased to have all of them on this program today to talk about america. what's the challenge for us? because wherever i go around the world the thing they say is tt we want america to take care of their business at home first, so that they can lead the world and pla an important part as the rest of the world changes. >> well, charlie, i think the world does understan that america provides a certain degree ofglobal governance and global goods, public goods that stabilize the world and fuel the global economy. i mean to me we are the tent pole that holds up the world. if we buckle your kids won't just grow up in a different america, they will grow up in a different world. and that is what i think what is playing out here is so important. i think our challengright now is to do four things at once. i think we have to stimulate the economy a little more because clearly we're rolling back, there ar
a government default. >> lehrer: mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> woodruff: and jeffrey brown gets a rare inside look at a syrian city where anti- government demonstrations have grown bigger and bolder from anthony shadid of "the new york times." >> reporter: hama is syria's fourth largest city. it's a significant place, and since last month when security forces withdrew, you've seen, i think, a notion of freedom emerge there. >> lehrer: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> well, the best companies are driven by new ideas. >> our future depends on new ideas. we spend billions on advanced technologies. >> it's all about investing in the future. >> we can find new energy-- more, cleaner, safer and smarter. >> collaborating with the best in the field. >> chevron works with the smartest people at leading universities and tech companies. >> and yet, it's really basic. >> it's paying off every day. the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 101 (some duplicates have been removed)